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Friends, in our effort to provide you with resources that can best help you teach your students some of the more difficult benchmarks, we are sharing this activity, aligned with Benchmark 3.8, Analyze the structure, functions, and processes of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches, which Also Assesses: SS.7.C.3.9—Illustrate the law making process at the local, state, and federal levels. This is an activity that can be done in a center, as homework, or for extra credit. Or you may simply choose to do it in line with other ways you are teaching this benchmark. This activity was developed by Dr. Terri Fine, the content specialist here at the Florida Joint Center for Citizenship.
This photo illustrates the governor signing a bill into law. 
Governor Rick Scott signing the $69 billion state budget for fiscal 2011-12 at The Villages in Sumter County, Florida. State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory, http://floridamemory.com/items/show/241861

Governor Rick Scott signing the $69 billion state budget for fiscal 2011-12 at The Villages in Sumter County, Florida.
State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory, http://floridamemory.com/items/show/241861

 
Identify and describe three (or more; teacher’s choice!) steps, in their correct order, that are required in order for the event in the photograph to take place:
(student completes appropriate number of steps below in the correct order for credit)
1.       Bill is introduced in both houses of the Florida legislature. (see sample item for this step)
2.      Bill is referred to the appropriate standing committee in each house of the Florida legislature (content focus terms)
3.      Each house approves the bill with a majority vote (sample item; not sure on the “majority” part but it appears to fit the first benchmark clarification)
4.      If there are differences between the bills approved by each house a conference committee will meet to agree on changes (content focus terms)
5.      Each house approves the same bill with a majority vote (see comment re: #3 above)
6.      The bill then goes to the governor for signature
NOTE: Alternately, if the bill is introduced and voted on in one house, then the process would be different as the bill would need to go to the other house for approval, then conference committee, etc.
Extra credit:  What can you infer from the persons standing behind Governor Scott?
(possible response:  the bill is probably about something impacting children such as education and children are a special interest group (content focus term) in the education policy area; state governments are responsible for providing education (tie-in to 3.14))
I hope that you find this activity useful! If you have additional ideas for teaching this or any other benchmark, please share in the comments or shoot me an email at stephen.masyada@ucf.edu
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