Florida Council for the Social Studies Annual Conference THIS WEEKEND!!

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Good afternoon friends! Don’t forget that the 2019 Florida Council for the Social Studies Annual Conference is coming and the end of this week, and there is still time to register! There will be so much good stuff. A fun themed reception will happen Friday night, so come dressed as your favorite villain or hero (historical or otherwise!) and enjoy some refreshments and networking with colleagues, friends, and peers. Explore the exhibit hall, where we have a number of excellent vendors available to support your work. Check out the keynote session on Saturday morning, and the excellent sessions all through the conference. And of course don’t forget the Professional Awards Dinner Saturday evening, where we will recognize our state social studies teachers of the year!

So come join us and grow, make new friends, find new colleagues, and have some fun! Register today! 

Teaching About Impeachment

Without a doubt, one of the relevant social studies discussion topics in the news today is the topic of impeachment. This is not a subject that is approached without trepidation in the current climate, but can we really teach government, civics, or history without addressing such significant current events? So how we can do this in such a way that our students learn and grow and we don’t end up in the news? In this post, we’ll share some good resources that can help you teach about impeachment! One of the things you will note here is that we DO NOT suggest asking students to take a position on the impeachment of President Trump. That is simply not a feasible or appropriate question for many of our classrooms. Instead, let’s consider other ways to address the difficult but important current event.

Pedagogical Suggestions 

Dr. Emma Humphries of iCivics offers a really good suggestion for approaching instruction around impeachment: 

Teaching the history can be another safe approach. And if you’re teaching older grades with higher reading levels, you can dive right into the Federalist Papers. What did Alexander Hamilton say in Federalist 65 about the impeachment process? Let’s start there. Let’s walk through what happened with President Johnson, with President Nixon, with President Clinton. What similarities do you see? How are these circumstances different? And ask a lot of questions. When students provide answers, really push them to provide evidence in those answers rather than just say what they’re feeling.

Be sure to check out the rest of her interview linked above! She discusses how to approach it with parents, how to address issues in the classroom, and more.

Teaching Impeaching: When Lessons Change
Jennifer Hitchcock
teachingimpaching
This blog post, by Jennifer Hitchcock from the iCivics Educator Network, presents her own experience in teaching about the impeachment inquiry and provides a good outline of the questions that she asked with her students. Please give it a read, as it really can help you decide how you want to approach this.

An Important Note

Well, we all want resources, don’t we? We’ve taken a look at some of the resources floating around out there (as always, be real careful about what you are pulling off of Teachers Pay Teachers or similiar sites), and identified a few that you might be able to use. As always, make sure that you are aligning your resources and instruction with the relevant standards and benchmarks. Some example middle school civics benchmarks are below.

Relevant Florida Middle School Civics Benchmarks

SS.7.C.1.7 Describe how the Constitution limits the powers of government through separation of powers and checks and balances.
SS.7.C.1.9 Define the rule of law and recognize its influence on the development of the American legal, political, and governmental systems.
SS.7.C.3.12 Analyze the significance and outcomes of landmark Supreme Court cases including, but not limited to, Marbury v. Madison, Plessy v. Ferguson, Brown v. Board of Education, Gideon v. Wainwright, Miranda v. Arizona, in re Gault, Tinker v. Des Moines, Hazelwood v. Kuhlmier, United States v. Nixon, and Bush v. Gore.
SS.7.C.2.10 Examine the impact of media, individuals, and interest groups on monitoring and influencing government.
SS.7.C.2.13 Examine multiple perspectives on public and current issues.
SS.7.C.3.3 Illustrate the structure and function (three branches of government established in Articles I, II, and III with corresponding powers) of government in the United States as established in the Constitution.
SS.7.C.3.8 Analyze the structure, functions, and processes of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches.
Also Assesses: SS.7.C.3.9—Illustrate the law making process at the local, state, and federal levels.
SS.7.C.3.11 Diagram the levels, functions, and powers of courts at the state and federal levels.
Also Assesses: SS. 7.C.2.6—Simulate the trial process and the role of juries in the administration of justice.

What benchmarks you choose will depend on the approach you take towards teaching about impeachment, so plan accordingly!

Resources for Instruction

High Crimes and Misdemeanors 
Constitutional Rights Foundation

HCM

This resource provides a strong foundation in understanding the constitutional language around impeachment. It has students completing an extended reading and associated comprehension questions about what ‘high crimes and misdemeanors’ means, and then gets into a scenario-based activity around the concept.

The Impeachment Process and President Trump
The Choices Program

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While the title of this resource may raise in the teacher the fear of parent (and school) pushback, it does not ask students to decide whether President Trump is worthy of impeachment. Rather, it is mainly focused on understanding media and sources, and developing media literacy skills, using the impeachment inquiry as a relevant and important foundation. Note, for example, that it provides sources from both sides of the question around the appropriateness of the inquiry. I would happily use this resource no matter what.

How Does Impeachment Work-A Quick TED Explainer
Ideas.ted.com

The video and its associated page (available at the link above) does a simply fantastic job laying out the process of impeachment and how it works. Indeed, the video is a really useful resource for helping kids how the process as a whole is supposed to be done. It’s worth your time!

Impeachment Proceedings
The Bill of Rights Institute

BORI impeach

This lesson, like others we have shared here, focuses on the process and the approach to impeachment, exploring the constitutional questions around impeachment.

A Final Note

The resources provided here take a couple of different approaches to teaching about impeachment, but they all have one thing in common: they DO NOT ask students to ‘decide whether President Trump deserves to be impeached’. While you are free to take that approach, you MUST recognize that you are likely opening a can of worms that could lead to challenges you may not want to or be able to deal with, especially as this is an ongoing event AND a heated emotional and political issue. The best approach is one that focuses on process and the Constitution and media literacy (which is why the Choices lesson is so good!).

Do you have resources about impeachment that you think are worth sharing? Shoot them our way! 

 

 

 

Florida Afterschool Alliance Recognizes the Efforts of the Lou Frey Institute!

Some happy news, friends! The Lou Frey Institute of Politics and Government (LFI) was recently recognized for their work with the Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Florida’s After School Zone by the Florida After School Alliance (FASA).  LFI was honored with the inaugural Special Recognition Award for their contribution to the civic well-being of Florida’s youth.

Since 2017, LFI and the Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Florida have partnered to provide a hands-on, civic learning experience for students in their after school program.  The Civic Action Project (CAP), was designed in collaboration with the Constitutional Rights Foundation (CRF), and is a free resource available to schools and community groups from CRF. CAP provides young people with opportunities to deliberate, collaborate, and form civic relationships with their peers as they investigate issues that matter to them. The premise of the project is to get young people to be thinking about their community, the impact public policy has on their community, and the ways they can interact with the decision makers to positively affect the issues they identify happening in their community.

In their nomination of the Lou Frey Institute to the FASA Awards Committee, the Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Florida said,

“The UCF Lou Frey Institute collaborative supports our Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Florida After School Zone mission of inspiring and enabling all young people including those from disadvantaged circumstances to reach their full potential as productive, responsible, and caring citizens. The Civic Action Project equips our middle school students with the tools for positive participation in local politics, social advocacy, and community engagement. Through the community involvement of the Lou Frey Institute, our young people are empowered to work as a team with their peers and adult leaders to promote historic initiatives that have the potential for lifelong benefits within the Central Florida region and beyond.”

Young people participating in the After School Zone have addressed projects that include, but are not limited to:

  • Cyber bullying prevention
  • Advocacy for adapting school and community playgrounds for children with disabilities
  • Elevating education for middle school students
  • Mental health support services for students
  • School gun violence prevention
  • Food waste prevention among school cafeterias in Orange County, Florida

Kelvin Curry, Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Florida’s Director of Middle School programs said,

“The Civic Action Project truly inspires and enables our young people to have a real voice and leave their positive mark on society as those who can stand on the right-side of history.”

 

The Lou Frey Institute was honored at the Florida After School Alliance’s annual awards banquet held at the end of September.

If you are interested in learning more about the Civic Action Project for your school or community group, please contact the Florida Joint Center for Citizenship’s Action Civics Coordinator, Chris Spinale. You may also reach out to LFI Interim Director Steve Masyada for more information.

Session Highlights of the 2019 FCSS Annual Conference: Florida CUFA Sessions

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Good afternoon friends! Don’t forget that the 2019 Florida Council for the Social Studies Annual Conference is coming soon (and you can register here!). Not only do we have some excellent regular sessions planned, but we also have our friends and colleagues from the Florida College and University Faculty Assembly joining us! Let’s take a look at some of their featured sessions, which targets those interested in some specifically research focused or driven sessions around the social studies! Please note that this list features only some of the planned sessions. 

Session 1

Complexity & Connections: Archaeology Addresses AP World History
Shannon Peck-Bartle, University of South Florida

 

Changes in the Advance Placement World History curriculum limit students’ ability to develop complicated webs of connections and human interactions. The use of material culture and archaeological methods are suggested to “thicken” the curriculum.

“I don’t want to cause trouble”: A white history teacher’s negotiation of racial boundaries in a diverse rural school
Travis Seay, University of Florida

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This narrative case study of a white history teacher uses a framework of cultural memory to situate racial and historical knowledge in the teaching and learning setting.

Session 2

The LGBTQ-Inclusive Curriculum: An Imperative for the Social Studies
Bárbara C. Cruz, Katty B. Francis, and Cristina M. Viera, University of South Florida

 

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This presentation provides a brief history of LGBTQ content in the K-12 social studies curriculum. Discussion focuses on popular approaches for integrating LGBTQ issues in the curriculum, current legal challenges, and trends in the field.

Incorporation of Cross-Curricular Training in Social Studies and English Language Arts Pre-Service Teacher Preparation Programs
Allison Sheridan, Mary Dougherty, and Chris Spinale, University of Central Florida

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For this study, the researchers aimed to examine how university programs are preparing pre-service teachers to incorporate social studies standards into ELA classrooms and vice versa. 

Session 3

Adolescent Identity Exploration and Civic Identity Development in a U.S. Government Classroom
Sarah Mead Denney, University of South Florida

 

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This multiple case study examined adolescent identity exploration and civic identity development in an AP U.S. Government class. Findings suggest the promotion of these processes is both possible and practical, but require intentional, purposeful teaching.

How Do I Get My Ideas Published?
Scott Waring, University of Central Florida

 

 

This session will include general publishing tips and an overview of four social studies journals currently edited by the presenter.  The remaining time will allow for discussion and an opportunity to pose questions.

Be sure to check this space for more! Register for the conference today! 

Learn here about the keynote!

Check out some of the sessions! and here!  and here! 

Check out some of the exhibitors here! and here!

 

The 2019 Florida Council for the Social Studies Annual Conference: Highlighting Some More of the Exhibitors!

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Good afternoon friends! Don’t forget that the 2019 Florida Council for the Social Studies Annual Conference is coming soon (and you can register here!). Not only do we have some excellent sessions planned, but we also have some fine exhibitors joining us. Today, we’ll highlight a few more (and don’t forget about some of the other ones that we covered earlier!).

The Florida Joint Center for Citizenship at the Lou Frey Institute

 
If you are reading this blog, you are likely familiar with the Florida Joint Center for Citizenship at UCF’s Lou Frey Institute. If you aren’t, take a look here and find out what we have to offer you to support your work in teaching civics, government, and US history. Or just visit our table at FCSS! We are excited to be able to still attend and support the Florida Council for the Social Studies and continue our outreach to teachers new and old!

Step Up America

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Step Up America joins FCSS at its annual conference again this year, and I know FCSS is happy to have them there. If you aren’t familiar with the good work that these folks do, be sure to check out their website and visit their space in the exhibit hall. Their Franklin Project is a unique learning experience that engages students of all ages. Ben Franklin comes directly into the classroom and interacts in real-time with students to present them with the civics and history lessons that are required by state standards. Be sure to stop by and say hi!

The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History

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FCSS is thrilled to have Gilder Lehrman joining us at this year’s conference. Be sure to visit their website as well as their space during the conference. Oh, and they are also doing what looks to be an excellent session!

The Arnold-Liebster Foundation

arnoldliebster

The Arnold-Liebster Foundation has a mission that is so important in this day and age. From their website:

The Arnold-Liebster Foundation seeks to promote peace, tolerance, human rights, and religious freedom by peaceful and nonpolitical means. Building on the Holocaust-era experiences of its founders, Max Liebster and Simone Arnold Liebster, the foundation supports historical research, teacher training, educational seminars, scholarly publications, roundtable discussions, museum exhibitions, film showings, and similar projects.

Through these activities, the foundation especially aims to help young people to repudiate racism, xenophobic nationalism, and violence, and to learn to listen to the voice of conscience.

Be sure to stop by and visit their space at the conference and see how they can play a role in helping your students understand their responsibilities in civic life and community.

And More! 

We’ll highlight additional exhibitors and sessions over the course of the next few weeks. Be sure to check this space for more! Register for the conference today! 

Learn here about the keynote!

Check out some of the sessions! and here!  and here! 

American Founders Month: Deborah Sampson!

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Check out the National Constitution Center’s biographies of the Founding Fathers! https://constitutioncenter.org/learn/educational-resources/founding-fathers

It’s Founders Month here in Florida! According to the Florida Department of Education,

Section (s.) 683.1455, Florida Statutes (F.S.), designates the month of September as American Founders‘ Month and s. 1003.421, F.S., recognizes the last full week of classes in September in public schools as Celebrate Freedom Week.

So what does this mean for our schools and kids and teachers? Basically, it’s time to do some learning about the men and women who have helped shape this state and this country. Here on our Florida Citizens blog, we’ll be doing at least two posts a week with a brief overview of a particular Founder, Framer, thinker, or shaper of this state or this nation and how they made an impact.

deborah sampson

Are you familiar with Deborah Sampson? If not, you should be, for we might consider her a Founding Mother, and certainly perhaps the first woman in US history to get a military pension.

She was born the poor daughter of a poor though preeminent family, a great granddaughter of founding Pilgrims Myles Standish and William Bradford. She was indentured at age 10, completing her service at 18 and then working as a self-educated teacher in Massachusetts. But in the heat of war, as the Revolution raged, she felt she had to do something more. She wanted to fight. But she was a woman, and that was impossible. Or was it?

She disguised herself as a man, and served as a light infantry scout, led men in battle, was wounded more than once (and taking care of the wounds herself, less her true sex be exposed) and served proudly as a soldier in Revolutionary Army. But then she fell ill and lost consciousness, and was then honorably discharged from the army. She married, had children, and traveled the new country telling her story.

“Four years after Sampson’s death at age 66, her husband petitioned Congress for pay as the spouse of a soldier. Although the couple was not married at the time of her service, in 1837 the committee concluded that the history of the Revolution “furnished no other similar example of female heroism, fidelity and courage.” He was awarded the money, though he died before receiving it.”

sampson marer

You can learn more about Deborah Sampson by visiting Mount Vernon’s excellent overview of her life and service! 

You can get a copy of the slide on Deborah Sampson here: Sampson AFM 2019

American Founders Month: The Sons of Liberty!

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Check out the National Constitution Center’s biographies of the Founding Fathers! https://constitutioncenter.org/learn/educational-resources/founding-fathers

It’s Founders Month here in Florida! According to the Florida Department of Education,

Section (s.) 683.1455, Florida Statutes (F.S.), designates the month of September as American Founders‘ Month and s. 1003.421, F.S., recognizes the last full week of classes in September in public schools as Celebrate Freedom Week.

So what does this mean for our schools and kids and teachers? Basically, it’s time to do some learning about the men and women who have helped shape this state and this country. Here on our Florida Citizens blog, we’ll be doing at least two posts a week with a brief overview of a particular Founder, Framer, thinker, or shaper of this state or this nation and how they made an impact.
Sept 14 Sons of Liberty

American Founders’ Month in Florida continues today with a look at the Sons of Liberty. The Sons of Liberty were a sometimes controversial secret society devoted to combating what it perceived as British oppression by any means necessary.

While they may be most famous for organizing boycotts of British goods and dumping tea into Boston Harbor, they also took sometimes-violent action against people seen as serving British interests. We all recall, for example, those images from the era that illustrate Sons of Liberty tarring and feathering British tax collectors.

Philip_Dawe_(attributed),_The_Bostonians_Paying_the_Excise-man,_or_Tarring_and_Feathering_(1774)_-_02

The Bostonian Paying the Excise-Man, 1774 British propaganda print, referring to the tarring and feathering, of Boston Commissioner of Customs John Malcolm four weeks after the Boston Tea Party. The men also poured hot tea down Malcolm’s throat

The Sons of Liberty were sometimes extreme in their pursuit of liberty; was that extremism always justified? How can we really say, from our own vantage point today? What a fascinating discussion we can have! You can learn more about the fascinating Sons of Liberty and its role in the Boston Tea Party from the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

Grab the PowerPoint slide featured in this post: Sons of Liberty AFM

More Highlights of the Upcoming Florida Council for the Social Studies Annual Conference

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A reminder, dear friends and colleagues, that the Florida Council for the Social Studies Annual Conference is fast approaching (and you can register here!). So let’s take a look at some more of the sessions on the docket for the conference!

Saturday, October 19th 

Econ Superheroes Save the Day!

d99e3a1c4a1cbc0ec4e4dfa66e09654aNow this looks fun! And how often do we say that about economics? 😉 

Superhero movies routinely top box office charts. Channel this interest and your students’ creative side in a lesson building understanding of economics and financial literacy through the invention of “econ superheroes”. Participants will create their own “Econ Superheroes” as they learn more about the Econ Superheroes lesson that teaches students critical concepts in economics and personal finance through creative thinking and art. Attendees will also develop their own myth busting “superpower” as they take part in an active learning lesson on myths, tall tales and legends about the Fed. A superhero movie trivia game will also be played during the session. 

This definitely looks like a session that could give you some great tools for teaching economic concepts! Be sure to check it out!

“Anyone who isn’t confused really doesn’t understand the situation” (Vietnam War 1963-1965)

U.S._Marines_in_Operation_Allen_Brook_(Vietnam_War)_001

This is a topic that is often difficult to teach, so getting to play with some rarely seen primary sources here could really help facilitate your instruction!

With the possible exception of the Civil War, no event in US history has demanded more soul searching than our engagement in Southeast Asia. The Vietnam War still matters because the essential questions it raised remain with us today. Participants will have the opportunity to actively engage with primary sources that they have not previously used or were not readily available to the public. Participants will have the opportunity to actively engage with primary sources that they have not previously used or were not readily available to the public. The Gilder Lehrman Institute has been given unique access to Bill Mauldin cartoons, military after action reviews, Tom Lehrer musical content, and documents from both North and South Vietnam. Teachers will come away with access to new lesson plans which explore the Battle of Ap Bac (1963) and aspects of decision making (one from the Kennedy Administration and one from the Johnson Administration). 

We are grateful for Gilder Lehrman sharing these resources and presenting them to our teachers here in Florida!

The State of the Assessments: Civics and U.S. History End-of-Course (EOC) Assessment

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This is a regularly offered session, presented by our dear friend and colleague Dr. Stacy Skinner, who heads up the social studies assessment work here in Florida! Always worth a visit, and the discussions are always lively as well. 🙂

This annual Conference message about the middle school Civics and high school U.S. History EOC Assessments will provide an overview of legislation and implementation, insights into the educator committee review process, and review of student performance data. The session will begin with an overview of the EOC assessments from legislation to implementation. The overview is designed to provide understandings of the origination and formation of the assessments, as well as its current application. The overview will be followed by insights into the educator committee review process. The insights are designed to emphasize the role of Florida educators in assessment-related processes (i.e., item review committees, CAC for Test Item Specifications and Test Release). The session will conclude with a review of student performance data from the initial administration to the most recent, spring 2019 administration. The review is designed to provide awareness of the Assessment’s reliability and validity as a standards-based measurement. Time will be dedicated for audience Q&A.

We are always so happy to have Dr. Skinner join us for this session!

No Villains, All Citizen Heroes: Teaching Civil Discourse

civil dosourse

Has there ever been a time where this session topic wasn’t relevant?

Can we teach civility? Let’s discuss the relationship between civil discourse and promoting informed, engaged citizens. Educators will experience and learn about the principles of civil discourse to take to their teaching teams and classrooms. Are we really less civil as a people than we once were? Has our political discourse devolved to the point of no return? Not necessarily. Political and mass communication methods and technology have evolved over time, changing the means of political discussion in both positive and negative ways. Social studies educators have a powerful role in promoting and shaping civil discourse as a skill in our future voters and leaders. Let’s define and teach how to engage in civil discourse as part of our constant effort to promote a more effective democratic society. We will set the stage by sharing a modern political cartoon pleading for “civil discourse.” We will ask participants to share how they define or what qualities define the terms “civility” and “civil discourse.” The National Institute for Civil Discourse defines civility as “showing mutual respect toward one another.” It defines civil discourse as “the free and respectful exchange of different ideas. It entails questioning and disputing, but doing so in a way that respects and affirms all persons, even while critiquing their arguments.” They conclude by stating, “it’s important, when practicing civility and civil discourse, to share our viewpoints and to listen to others. It doesn’t mean we have to agree, but it means we can disagree respectfully.” (https://www.revivecivility.org/civility) Teachers will be presented with primary sources and scenarios from political debates and exchanges and asked to identify the era of origin of each quote. Quickly participants will come to the conclusion that political discourse has not devolved (it has always had elements of incivility), but the means of engaging have changed. For example, participants will be presented with an edited draft of the Declaration of Independence, data on the individual and state actions required to finalize and approve it, an account of hearing the document read in a public space, and the short and long-term consequences from the public reading in Charleston, South Carolina. We will consider the modern equivalents: open records laws allowing us to see the progression of a bill in state legislature or Congress, media coverage of such bills in different places and platforms and over the life of a bill, chatter on social media about legislative activity between and among officials and citizens, and the ever-widening net of public opinion and its impact on reputation and elections. Redefining Social Media: The landscape of “social media” has changed. Social media might include any means to communicate ideas publicly. We will examine how changes in technology, such as the progression from public readings to digital exchange, have affected civil discourse. Over time the size of the audience, organization, and degree of anonymity have changed. Principles of Civil Discourse: Participants will explore a model for teaching civil discourse adapted from various organizations. Discussion will include how to adapt instruction for different types of learners (i.e. teacher teams, grade level, academic program) and to account for generational differences between teachers and students.

This is a session that I definitely plan on attending. We do need to learn how to talk to each other, and so do our kids!

So these are just some of the cool sessions we will be having at the conference. Why don’t you go ahead and register for this now! 

American Founders’ Month: Patrick Henry!

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Check out the National Constitution Center’s biographies of the Founding Fathers! https://constitutioncenter.org/learn/educational-resources/founding-fathers

It’s Founders Month here in Florida! According to the Florida Department of Education,

Section (s.) 683.1455, Florida Statutes (F.S.), designates the month of September as American Founders‘ Month and s. 1003.421, F.S., recognizes the last full week of classes in September in public schools as Celebrate Freedom Week.

So what does this mean for our schools and kids and teachers? Basically, it’s time to do some learning about the men and women who have helped shape this state and this country. Here on our Florida Citizens blog, we’ll be doing at least two posts a week with a brief overview of a particular Founder, Framer, thinker, or shaper of this state or this nation and how they made an impact.

Sept 23 or 24 Henry

American Founders’ Month continues in Florida, and it coincides with Freedom Week. There may be no quote more famous in our nation’s history than Patrick Henry’s “…give me liberty or give me death!” It is perhaps an appropriate way to start off our celebration of Freedom Week as we wrap up American Founders’ Month.

Patrick Henry, like many of his peers, was a man of many talents, beliefs, and contradictions. He was a brilliant orator, fiery and powerful, but few of his speeches survived him, as he rarely wrote anything down. Unlike his contemporaries, he did not write many letters, so we have few primary sources to consider him with. A passionate advocate for liberty, he was, like many of his elite contemporaries from the South, a slave holder. Like many of them (though not all!) he recognized the evils of slavery without necessarily choosing a path towards relief of his own complicity. A believer in strong bonds across the states, he was embittered by what he saw as New England’s reluctance to contribute fairly to the national project under the Articles of Confederation.

His passion for liberty led Henry initiallt to the Anti-Federalist camp; he did not trust those working in Philadelphia at the constitutional convention, and he did not trust the new Constitution.

 This Constitution is said to have beautiful features; but when I come to examine these features, Sir, they appear to me horribly frightful: Among other deformities, it has an awful squinting; it squints towards monarchy: And does not this raise indignation in the breast of every American? Your President may easily become King: Your Senate is so imperfectly constructed that your dearest rights may be sacrificed by what may be a small minority; and a very small minority may continue forever unchangeably this Government, although horridly defective: Where are your checks in this Government? Your strong holds will be in the hands of your enemies: It is on a supposition that our American Governors shall be honest, that all the good qualities of this Government are founded: But its defective, and imperfect construction, puts it in their power to perpetrate the worst of mischiefs, should they be bad men

Ultimately, however, he sided with the Federalists, in part because of rivalry with his fellow Virginian Thomas Jefferson. He is, without a doubt, a good person to begin this Freedom Week with. You can learn more about Patrick Henry’s famous ‘give me liberty’ speech with this close reading plan here!

Grab the PowerPoint slide featured in this post: Patrick Henry AFM

On the Passing of Dr. David Colburn

david coburn

We here at the Florida Joint Center for Citizenship at the Lou Frey Institute were saddened to learn of the passing of the wonderful Dr. David Colburn, former director of UF’s Bob Graham Center (among many other roles played at the University of Florida). Dr. Colburn was a fantastic colleague, a strong friend, a good teacher, an effective and well-known scholar, and a wonderful advocate for civic education. He was a friend of the Joint Center and the Institute, and he will be missed. Our deepest condolences to Dr. Colburn’s family and friends, the Bob Graham Center, and the broader University of Florida community.

We encourage you to read this fond remembrance of Dr. Colburn shared by our friends at the Graham Center.  

His family suggests that expressions of sympathy may be made in the form of donations through the Graham Center’s David Colburn Student Advancement Fund, c/o the UF Foundation, P.O. Box 14425, Gainesville, 32604-2425, or to Holy Trinity Episcopal Church, 100 NE 1st Street, Gainesville 32601.

Services are scheduled for Sunday, Sept. 22, at Holy Trinity Church, 100 NE 1st Street, Gainesville 32601 at 2 p.m. The university plans a public service later this fall.